Immigrants shaped New Haven of today

Immigrants shaped New Haven of today

Brian Zahn, “Immigrants Shaped New Haven of Today,” New Haven Register, June 21, 2018.  “…in 2016, a FiveThirtyEight analysis concluded that New Haven is the most demographically representative metropolitan area in the nation… Today, New Haven proudly bears the Amistad Memorial outside City Hall, commemorating the U.S. Supreme Court case argued in New Haven that found Africans on a slave ship in 1839 had a right to mutiny and were acting in self-defense…” This is a wonderfully researched article with numerous photographs included.

Coming to Connecticut

Coming to Connecticut

Connecticut Magazine, October 2014. “Connecticut remains a fertile settling ground for immigrants. Due in large part to the state’s proximity to New York City and Ellis Island, the historical main entry point for many arriving from overseas, and its own multiple ports, which over the centuries have allowed direct international border access, Connecticut has been able to cultivate a level of ethnic diversity not found in other states. And that diversity only keeps growing.”

Connecticut History Illustrated

Connecticut History Illustrated

The site contains images for 24 items as a sampling of resources relevant to immigration available in Connecticut History Illustrated. At the site you can do searches for particular ethnic groups using terms such as Italian American or Chinese American, and/or use the “Topics” terms to the left of the search results to refine your search.

Connecticut Humanities: Late 19th-Century Immigration in Connecticut

Late 19th-Century Immigration in Connecticut

Immigration to Connecticut in the second half of the 19th century proceeded much as it had in earlier decades. Driven from their homelands by changing social and economic conditions, waves of primarily European immigrants arrived in Connecticut and increasingly found homes in industrial cities. What distinguished immigration later in the century, however, was the vastly increased numbers of new arrivals to the state, the variety of population centers from which they departed, and the growing hostility they faced upon arrival.

Connecticut Humanities: Early 19th-Century Immigration in Connecticut

Early 19th-Century Immigration in Connecticut

Early 19th-Century Immigration in Connecticut. Numerous factors contributed to the growth of Connecticut in the decades following American independence. Among these were the state’s abundant supplies of water for powering industry, its navigable rivers, natural resources, proximity to major metropolitan areas, and access to the sea. Perhaps most important, however, were its people. After utilizing its citizens’ good old-fashioned “Yankee ingenuity” to lay the groundwork for industrialization, the human resources driving Connecticut’s growth in the early 19th century came increasingly from overseas. Waves of immigrants from northern and western Europe helped the state grow and prosper and paved the way for the massive influx of immigrants that occurred in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

How the Italian Immigrants Came to New England

How the Italian Immigrants Came to New England

New England Historical Society, “How the Italian Immigrants Came to New England,” 2019. This overview essay, complete with numerous images, discusses how Italian immigrants put their stamp on New England as indelibly as any Puritan. New England, in fact, is the most Italian region in the United States. Today, the descendants of Italian immigrants make up more than 10 percent of the population of every New England state except Vermont and Maine.

When America Despised the Irish: The 19th Century’s Refugee Crisis

When America Despised the Irish: The 19th Century’s Refugee Crisis

Christopher Klein, “When America Despised the Irish: The 19th Century’s Refugee Crisis,” History. 

“More than 150 years ago, it was the Irish who were refugees forced into exile by a humanitarian and political disaster. Explore this era of scorn the Irish initially encountered and find out how they became part of the American mainstream.”