Massachusetts Institute of Technology Land Acknowledgement Statement

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Land Acknowledgement Statement

“MIT acknowledges Indigenous Peoples as the traditional stewards of the land, and the enduring relationship that exists between them and their traditional territories. The land on which we sit is the traditional unceded territory of the Wampanoag Nation. We acknowledge the painful history of genocide and forced occupation of their territory, and we honor and respect the many diverse indigenous people connected to this land on which we gather from time immemorial.”

University of Maine Land Acknowledgement

University of Maine Land Acknowledgement

“The University of Maine recognizes that it is located on Marsh Island in the homeland of the Penobscot Nation, where issues of water and territorial rights, and encroachment upon sacred sites, are ongoing. Penobscot homeland is connected to the other Wabanaki Tribal Nations — the Passamaquoddy, Maliseet, and Micmac — through kinship, alliances and diplomacy. The university also recognizes that the Penobscot Nation and the other Wabanaki Tribal Nations are distinct, sovereign, legal and political entities with their own powers of self-governance and self-determination.”

Native American Institute

Native American Institute

“There are hundreds of Indigenous communities across the United States. Giving a land acknowledgement requires research and reflection to understand the historical and contemporary Indigenous communities having a relationship with the land. A land acknowledgement can be a few sentences or several pages. It is important the statement honors and names the communities, and recognizes the occupied or unceded nature and history of the land. Although land acknowledgements are powerful statements, they are only meaningful when they are coupled with authentic and sustained relationships with Indigenous communities and community-informed actions.”

Indigenous New Hampshire

Indigenous New Hampshire

“Indigenous New Hampshire is a collaboration between the students and faculty of the University of New Hampshire Anthropology Department, Denise and Paul Pouliot of the Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook Abenaki People, other Indigenous people of Abenaki and other Tribal affiliations who live in NH, local historians, archaeologists, and community volunteers and participants of different educational backgrounds. This long-term project intends to reframe New Hampshire’s history from an Indigenous perspective.”

Massachusetts Center for Native American Awareness

Massachusetts Center for Native American Awareness

“Our mission is to preserve Native American cultural traditions; to assist Native American residents with basic needs and educational expenses; to advance public knowledge and understanding that helps dispel inaccurate information about Native Americans; and to work towards racial equality by addressing inequities across the region.”

A Blog for American History

A Blog for American History

Process is the blog of the Organization of American Historians, The Journal of American History, and The American Historian. “We, along with other Italian Studies and Italian American Studies scholars, are unified against Columbus heroification. We have asked ourselves, how does the ongoing and complicated history of Italian Americans’ memorialization of Columbus fit into contemporary decolonizing efforts? We add our voices here in hope of contributing to larger conversations around racism, history, education, and civic commemoration.”

Why Columbus Day Courts Controversy

“Why Columbus Day Courts Controversy”

“Like many European explorers, Christopher Columbus encountered indigenous people throughout his voyages. There are three main sources of controversy involving his interactions with the indigenous people he labeled “Indians”: the use of violence and slavery, the forced conversion of native peoples to Christianity and the introduction of a host of new diseases that would have dramatic long-term effects on native people in the Americas.”