Decolonization is not a Metaphor

Decolonization is not a Metaphor

Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society, 2012. Our goal in this article is to remind readers what is unsettling about decolonization. Decolonization brings about the repatriation of Indigenous land and life; it is not a metaphor for other things we want to do to improve our societies and schools. The easy adoption of decolonizing discourse by educational advocacy and scholarship, evidenced by the increasing number of calls to “decolonize our schools,” or use “decolonizing methods,” or, “decolonize student thinking”, turns decolonization into a metaphor. As important as their goals may be, social justice, critical methodologies, or approaches that decenter settler perspectives have objectives that may be incommensurable with decolonization.

Brown University Center for Digital Scholarship, “Fox Point Oral Histories.”

Brown University Center for Digital Scholarship, “Fox Point Oral Histories.”

Since 2008, Brown University students have worked to preserve and present the cultural heritage of Providence’s Fox Point neighborhood through oral history interviews and public programs. Fox Point borders the Brown University campus, and currently serves as a home to students and staff from the nearby universities, numerous restaurants and upscale shops, and India Point Park… Before the 1960s, however, Fox Point’s residents – primarily first and second-generation immigrant families from Portugal, Cape Verde, and Ireland – labored on the waterfront, worked in local factories, worshipped at the neighborhood’s churches, and managed the corner markets and bars that dotted the area… The Fox Point Oral History project aims to capture these changes through recorded life history interviews with current and former residents, business owners, and others with a stake in the area, preserving memories of community life over the past 70 years.

Latinos in Rhode Island

Latinos in Rhode Island

Latinos in Rhode Island. Nuestras Raíces: The Latino Oral History Project of Rhode Island was started in 1991 with one single interview. Since then, it has become a wide-range collection of personal stories, photos and pieces of paper documenting the history of Rhode Island’s Spanish-speaking community. Our mission is to collect, share and celebrate the diverse experiences through the voices of Latinos in Rhode Island. The Rhode Island Latino History Collection is the official archives of Latino history in the State of Rhode Island. It was created to make public what before 1991 were unheard stories and unseen photos that have been generously shared by the people whose stories we tell.

The Rhode Island Historical Society. Research tools for immigration history of Rhode Island.

The Rhode Island Historical Society. Research tools for immigration history of Rhode Island.

Includes passenger lists and maritime records. “Some passenger lists for specific immigrant groups are available. Additionally, access to the Immigrant Ships Transcribers Guild is available on our Internet station. Locating passenger lists for some groups – for instance, Irish passengers who emigrated during the potato famine – can be challenging.”

Passenger Manifest (1848-1891)

Passenger Manifest (1848-1891)

Massachusetts officials started recording the names of immigrants who arrived by ship in January of 1848, a procedure which continued until July of 1891, when federal records-keeping programs superseded those of the state. Although immigrants arrived at numerous Massachusetts ports, the Archives holds manifests for BOSTON ONLY. These are arranged chronologically according to the date when the ship arrived in port. The Archives holds the original manifests as well as the only microfilm copy available of these Passenger manifests. The Archives has an alphabetical card index covering the same years as the registers and providing the same information. This includes the name, age, sex and occupation of the immigrant; the country of birth, last residence and the passenger list number.

Somalis In Maine Bibliography

Somalis In Maine Bibliography

A list of online resources and research related to the arrival and integration of Somali refugees in Maine, created by  Bates Professor Elizabeth Eames and students in her community-engaged learning courses.

The University of Southern Maine’s  Franco-American Collection

The University of Southern Maine’s Franco-American Collection

The University of Southern Maine’s Lewiston-Auburn College is home to the Franco-American Collection, one of the premier collections of archival material relating to Maine’s Franco-American population. Resources available online include oral histories, digitized documents, virtual exhibitions, and audio-visual materials.