WBUR, “This Makeshift School Teaches Children Seeking Asylum At The Southern Border.”

WBUR, “This Makeshift School Teaches Children Seeking Asylum At The Southern Border.”

Atop a scorching concrete lot in September, hundreds of migrants and asylum-seekers were stuck living in a tent city right next to a bridge that leads to the U.S. Many of them have months-long waits ahead to cross that southern border into Brownsville, Texas, for a chance to talk to an American immigration judge… (read more).

Asylum Hangover? Governments Seek to Narrow Avenues for Humanitarian Protection

Asylum Hangover? Governments Seek to Narrow Avenues for Humanitarian Protection

Migration Policy Institute. Sara Staedicke and Michelle Mittelstadt, “Asylum Hangover? Governments Seek to Narrow Avenues for Humanitarian Protection,” December 2018. From the article: “Faced with absorbing vast numbers of asylum seekers who headed to Europe during the 2015-16 migration crisis and the ongoing arrival of much smaller, but steady flows of Central Americans at the U.S.-Mexico border, EU Member States and the United States in 2018 took or explored steps to narrow asylum and harden policies.”

Refugees and Asylees in the United States

Refugees and Asylees in the United States

Migration Policy Institute. Brittany Blizzard and Jeanne Batalova, “Refugees and Asylees in the United States,” June 2019. From the article: “Global displacement reached a record high of 68.5 million people by the end of 2017, according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Approximately 25.4 million of these individuals were formally designated as refugees, 40 million were internally displaced persons, and 3.1 million were asylum seekers.”

Immigration to Manchester, New Hampshire

Immigration to Manchester, New Hampshire

Sally Ward, “Immigration to Manchester, New Hampshire,” Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, Spring 2015. “Immigration, historically important for Manchester’s economy, today means a younger, more diverse population, with the attendant opportunities and challenges.” 

Center for Civic Reflection, “Fences & Neighbors: New Hampshire’s Immigration Stories.”

Center for Civic Reflection, “Fences & Neighbors: New Hampshire’s Immigration Stories.”

The three-year statewide project, which ran from the fall of 2009 through the spring of 2012, examined immigration to New Hampshire through a wide variety of formats, including oral histories, literacy programs, a documentary film, an original play, and civic reflection dialogue programs. 

New Hampshire Historical Society, “300 Years Ago: The Scots-Irish in Provincial New Hampshire.”

New Hampshire Historical Society, “300 Years Ago: The Scots-Irish in Provincial New Hampshire.”

“2019 marks the 300th anniversary of the Scots-Irish migration to New Hampshire. The Scots-Irish would become the largest group of non-English immigrants to the colony. At the time, they were seen as fundamentally different from the English—a different religion, a different history, and a different culture—and the English settlers greeted them with a fair amount of suspicion and hostility.”