New Hampshire’s Immigration Story: The History of Immigration in New Hampshire

New Hampshire’s Immigration Story: The History of Immigration in New Hampshire

New Hampshire Public Radio, “New Hampshire’s Immigration Story: The History of Immigration in New Hampshire,” November 2011. “We’re looking at the history of immigration as a part of NHPR’s year-long series on New Hampshire’s Immigration Story. In the early days, it was French Canadians and Irish who arrived, at the turn of the last century Greeks and Eastern Europeans and today, new arrivals from Brazil, to Burundi to Bhutan. We’re looking at who came, why they came and the little known stories around our immigration history.” 

Jennifer James. “Refugee Instructional Activities Common Core Grade.”

Jennifer James. “Refugee Instructional Activities Common Core Grade.”

All of the pins included in this board relate to the Refugee Crisis topic. Many of these resources are complete teaching tools for you to cover the Refugee Crisis in your classroom. Please note that some of the resources start at grade 6 but provide activities and other learning tools up to grade 12.

PBS Point of View. “The Global Refugee Crisis: A Community Responds.”

PBS Point of View. “The Global Refugee Crisis: A Community Responds.”

Daphne Matziaraki’s 24-minute film 4.1 Miles follows local coast guard officers stationed off the Greek island of Lesbos, where thousands of refugees have braved the Mediterranean to flee conflicts at home. The waters of this small island were once tranquil, but the Coast Guard now finds itself overwhelmed by the task of saving hundreds of migrants from drowning at sea every week. Docks previously lined with restaurants have become makeshift first-response centers for the enormous number of people attempting to make the crossing–more than 600,000 from Turkey alone in 2015. Nominated for the 2017 Academy Award for Best Documentary Short Subject. Grades 6 – 12.

Teaching Tolerance. “Immigrant and Refugee Children: A Guide for Educators and School Support Staff.”

Teaching Tolerance. “Immigrant and Refugee Children: A Guide for Educators and School Support Staff.”

This guide was created for educators, school support staff and service providers who teach, mentor and help open the doors of opportunity for undocumented youth and unaccompanied and refugee children currently living in the United States. Educators, school support staff and service providers are often the first individuals a student and/or family comes out to as undocumented.

Amnesty International. “8 educational resources to better understand the refugee crisis.”

Amnesty International. “8 educational resources to better understand the refugee crisis.”

The world refugee crisis has led civil society to mobilize, and initiatives calling for greater support to refugees have multiplied across countries. But at the same time, there have been increasing demands, especially from schools on how to work on this issue, asking how to discuss it with young people, or with students. Teachers and educators can use the primary and secondary school curriculum packs containing lesson plans on refugees.

PBS Teachers Lounge. “Integrating the Refugee Crisis into Your Curriculum.”

PBS Teachers Lounge. “Integrating the Refugee Crisis into Your Curriculum.”

Materials center on the use of the 20-minute documentary ‘Welcome to Canada’ into the classroom. This short film highlights a young Syrian refugee, Mohammed Alsaleh, who was granted asylum in Canada. Mohammed now works to help resettle newly arrived refugees. Welcome to Canada, and its companion lesson plan, “A Refugee’s Story,” encourages students to explore the impact of immigration as well as the themes of cultural displacement, human rights, and resilience.

The Choices Program, Brown University. “Refugee Stories: Mapping a Crisis.”

The Choices Program, Brown University. “Refugee Stories: Mapping a Crisis.”

Students will explore the human geography of the current refugee crisis. They will employ provided data to create a map of the crisis. Examine refugee stories and use them to map their experiences.

And, consider challenges facing the international community and weigh responses to the crisis. Videos, primary sources, maps, discussion questions, and photographs are provided.

Facing History and Ourselves. “Understanding the Global Refugee Crisis.”

Facing History and Ourselves. “Understanding the Global Refugee Crisis.”

Teachers will find videos and a range of curriculum materials designed to provide ways to discuss the global refugee crisis. Students will gain a better understanding of the refugee crisis and what it means to be a refugee. They will reflect on the implications of the historical episode involving the St. Louis in 1939, particularly in relation to responses to the current refugee crisis. Students will consider the importance of “humanizing” those who otherwise seem distant and different from us.

George Lucas Educational Foundation. Teaching Poetry of the Immigrant Experience.

George Lucas Educational Foundation. Teaching Poetry of the Immigrant Experience.

‘I’m From’ poems, multicultural poetry collections, and the poetic artifacts of immigration history can teach valuable language arts as well as the rich tapestry of American culture. Bringing poems about the immigration experience into the classroom engenders cultural understanding and empathy. It highlights the human aspect of immigration often occluded by political rhetoric, and it engages youth voice. The site contains six ways to teach poetry of the immigrant experience in the classroom.

Global Citizen. “14 Photos That Show America’s Long History of Immigration.”

Global Citizen. “14 Photos That Show America's Long History of Immigration.”

The Immigrants’ showcases the diversity of people who came to the US in hopes of finding safety and living the “American Dream.” People from around the world came to the US, passing through New York’s Ellis Island and California’s Angel Island — dubbed “the Ellis Island of the West.” And though most of the images featured in the exhibition are from the first half of the 20th century, they are poignantly relevant to today’s immigration discussion.