Seeking More Freedom!

Seeking More Freedom!

History Teaching Institute, Ohio State University. “Seeking More Freedom!” In the early 1900s, immigration to American reached a peak. Most of these newcomers settled in American cities. As machinery displaced Americans who worked on farms, they also poured into the cities. Many Americans criticized the immigrants for taking jobs away from Americans because they were more willing to accept lower wages. During World War I (1914-1918), European immigration declined. It picked up after the war, and debate about how to regulate immigration to the United States resumed. In 1921 the U.S. congress adopted a quota system severely restricting immigration from southern and eastern Europe.

Irish Immigration to the United States

Irish Immigration to the United States

History Teaching Institute, Ohio State University. “Irish Immigration to the United States.” Brief overview of the how various immigrant groups have been accepted with a focus upon the Irish. Discussion of the melting pot concept of immigration and how it compares to the ‘salad bowl’ concept of immigration. Discussion of what it means to be a citizen of a country. 7th and 8th grade

Immigration in U.S. History: Through the Eye of Editorial Cartoons

Immigration in U.S. History: Through the Eye of Editorial Cartoons

History Teaching Institute, Ohio State University. “Immigration in U.S. History: Through the Eye of Editorial Cartoons.” Generally students focus more on the causes of immigration and the perspectives of the immigrants themselves in a segmented, period by period view of immigration. This should have already been covered in class. In this lesson, students will relate the past of U.S. immigration to the present media conversation through a thematic, domestic perspective. Through an analysis of political cartoons dealing with immigration and racism from the 19th century through the present, students will make inferences about the opinions, biases and fears of Americans of these periods relating to the social, political, and economic effects of immigration. 9th grade

Library of Congress. “Immigration History First Hand.”

Library of Congress. “Immigration History First Hand.”

Designed to provide elementary children with experiences which enable them to begin understanding primary sources. Students move from personal artifacts to the vast Library of Congress online collections and learn how archival collections are organized, how to interpret artifacts and documents, how to use primary sources to tell a real story and how to do online research.

Library of Congress. “Immigration and Migration: Today and During the Great Depression”

Library of Congress. “Immigration and Migration: Today and During the Great Depression”

Eight lesson plans at this site). Is there a novel in every person? Are there stories that have never been told because they seemed unimportant? What is the value of the lives of people who will never be famous or have their biographies written? Students address these questions through activities using oral history methods and investigating life in the 1930s. They compare immigration/migration experiences of their families to those of people living through the Great Depression using interviews with parents, and photographs, films, and documents from the Library of Congress and other sources.

Using Photographs to Teach Social Justice: Exposing Anti-Immigration Sentiment

Using Photographs to Teach Social Justice: Exposing Anti-Immigration Sentiment

Teaching Tolerance: “Using Photographs to Teach Social Justice: Exposing Anti-Immigration Sentiment.” The photo shows an anti-immigration protest on the campus of the University of California at Berkeley. People with picket signs are arguing for stricter immigration policies that would make it a felony to be in the United States illegally. In this lesson, you will analyze two photographs, each dealing with a different element of identity. This is part of the Using Photographs to Teach Social Justice series. Grades 6-8 and 9-12.

5 Tips For Teaching Immigration to Elementary Students

5 Tips For Teaching Immigration to Elementary Students

Population Education. Pete Bailey, “5 Tips For Teaching Immigration to Elementary Students,” October, 2019. “

Immigration is a hot button issue in the United States and around the world. Therefore, it is likely that students as young as elementary school have heard about immigration in some way or another. Because students may have varying background knowledge on the subject, it is important to fill in any gaps and correct misconceptions about why people immigrate, who immigrants are, and why immigration has always been a hallmark of the United States.”

Ailing Vermont Town Pins Hopes on Mideast Refugees​

Ailing Vermont Town Pins Hopes on Mideast Refugees

Jess Bidgood, “Ailing Vermont Town Pins Hopes on Mideast Refugees,” New York Times, January 2, 2017. “They hustled into the church on a biting winter evening, unburdened themselves of scarves and gloves, and settled into pews to sound out words in Arabic. “Ahlan fii Rutland,” said Fran Knapp, a retiree who lives about 20 minutes away, one of two or three dozen people who have attended a class here on rudimentary Arabic. ‘Welcome to Rutland.’ It was one of many preparations this remote city in central Vermont is making before 100 refugees from Syria and Iraq arrive here over the next year, with the first expected to come later this month.”

‘My Language Is My Language, But I’m a Vermonter’

‘My Language Is My Language, But I’m a Vermonter’

Erick Trickey, ‘My Language Is My Language, But I’m a Vermonter,’Politico Magazine, November 17, 2016. “Vermont has accepted thousands of refugees over the years, boosting the population and the economy. A debate over accepting Syrians put the state to the test.”