A Portrait of New England’s Immigrants

A Portrait of New England’s Immigrants

Antoniya Owens, “A Portrait of New England’s Immigrants,” New England Public Policy Center Research Report, November 2008. “New England is home to 1.6 million immigrants. Their number is growing far faster than that of the native population. They are more likely than natives to be of working age. Moreover, they are better educated than immigrants nationwide, with more than three quarters having a high school diploma, and close to a third holding a bachelor’s degree. For all these reasons, immigrants contribute importantly to the growth of the region’s labor force.” 

Immigration to Manchester, New Hampshire: History, Trends, and Implications

Immigration to Manchester, New Hampshire: History, Trends, and Implications

Sally Ward, Justin Young, and Curt Grimm, “Immigration to Manchester, New Hampshire: History, Trends, and Implications,” Carsey School of Public Policy, May 2014. “The origins of recent immigrants to Manchester are very different from the origins of those who labored in Amoskeag Mills. Only 30 percent of recent immigrants come from regions that gave Manchester its mill workers (North America and Europe). Today’s immigrants are more likely to come from Latin America, Asia, and Africa. In addition, since 1980, Manchester—as well as other New Hampshire localities—has been a resettlement site for international refugees, part of a program created by the Federal Refugee Act of 1980 that established resettlement sites in all states.” 

Profile of New Hampshire’s Foreign-born Population

Profile of New Hampshire’s Foreign-born Population

Ross Gitell and Timothy Lord, “Profile of New Hampshire’s Foreign-born Population,” Carsey Institute, Spring 2008. “At the turn of the 20th century, new Hampshire had over 88,000 foreign-born persons, over 15,000 more than it has today. In 1900, the state’s concentration of foreign-born (21 percent) was higher than the national average percentage and more than three times the current percentage of 6 percent in the state. In 1900, New Hampshire ranked 15th of all states in the percentage of the foreign-born population. Currently, New Hampshire ranks 26th of the 50 states. The number of foreign-born living in new Hampshire and New England peaked around 1920…” 

Immigration to Manchester, New Hampshire: History, Trends, and Implications

Immigration to Manchester, New Hampshire: History, Trends, and Implications

Sally K. Ward, Justin R. Young, and Curt Grimm, “Immigration to Manchester, New Hampshire: History, Trends, and Implications,” Carsey Institute, Spring 2014. “Immigration has been an important part of American history as well as that of New Hampshire and Manchester… In 2010, approximately 12 percent or around 13,000 of Manchester residents were immigrants.” 

The Contributions of New Americans in New Hampshire

The Contributions of New Americans in New Hampshire

New American Economy Report, “The Contributions of New Americans in New Hampshire,” 2016.  In New Hampshire, the recent increase in immigrant residents has helped the state to stave off the sort of population decline—or sluggish growth—that has recently hurt other nearby states… Between 2010 and 2014, the number of immigrants living in New Hampshire grew by 10.5%… Tod, New Hampshire is home to more than 78,000 foreign-born residents.” 

International Council for Science. “Climate Refugees and Environmental Migration.”

International Council for Science. “Climate Refugees and Environmental Migration.”

As a high school or undergraduate Social Sciences, Humanities, or Environmental Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching about topics such as Social and Environmental Policy, Climate Change and Human Migration, Climate Refugees/Environmental Migrants, and Climate Justice. This lesson plan enables students to learn about human migration caused by climate change, and the term “climate refugees” and its growing significance. The activity provides insights into geographic locations whose existence is threatened by climate change, and communities that are fleeing their homes, resulting in large-scale migration.

PBS Learning Media. “A Refugee’s Story (Lesson Plan) Global Oneness Project.”

PBS Learning Media. “A Refugee's Story (Lesson Plan) Global Oneness Project.”

Students watch a 19-minute documentary that tells the story of Mohammed Alsaleh, a young Syrian refugee granted asylum in Canada in 2014, who now counsels newly arrived refugees. In this lesson, students explore through classroom discussions the themes of cultural displacement, human rights, and resilience. Reflective writing prompts are included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story. Designed for Massachusetts Curriculum Standards. Grades 9 – 12