Teaching Immigration with the Immigrant Stories Project

Teaching Immigration with the Immigrant Stories Project

Founded in 1965, the University of Minnesota’s Immigration History Research Center (IHRC) aims to transform how we understand immigration in the past and present. Along with its partner, the IHRC Archives, it is North America’s oldest and largest interdisciplinary research center and archives devoted to preserving and understanding immigrant and refugee life. The IHRC promotes interdisciplinary research on migration, race, and ethnicity in the United States and the world. It connects U.S. immigration history research to contemporary immigrant and refugee communities through its Immigrant Stories project. It advances public dialogue about immigration through its public programming, supports teaching and learning at all levels, and develops archives documenting immigrant and refugee experiences for future generations.

Queen City Culture: Immigration, Food, Culture, and Burlington’s Local Food System

Queen City Culture: Immigration, Food, Culture, and Burlington's Local Food System

Ashley Raymond, “Queen City Culture: Immigration, Food, Culture, and Burlington’s Local Food System,” Scholar Works, University of Vermont, 2019. “This research is aimed at bringing to light, the scale of influence that Burlington’s immigrant history has had on the local food system which we see today.”

19th Century French-Canadian Immigration to Vermont

19th Century French-Canadian Immigration to Vermont

Michael F. Dwyer, “19th Century French-Canadian Immigration to Vermont: From Hyppolite Prunier to Fred Plumtree,” Walloomsack Review, 18, 20 – 29. “

By the beginning of the twentieth century, one could see the architectural imprint of French-Canadian settlement on the cultural landscape of Vermont. French-speaking Catholics built monumental churches in Burlington, Winooski, St. Albans, Rutland, Newport, and St. Johnsbury, among other towns. Each of these parish communities has its own stories-within-stories of French-Canadians who struggled to maintain their language, identity, and culture within an English-speaking and, sometimes hostile, Catholic hierarchy.”

French Canadian Immigration to Vermont and New England (1840-1930)

French Canadian Immigration to Vermont and New England (1840-1930)

Leslie Choquette , “French Canadian Immigration to Vermont and New England (1840-1930),” Vermont History, 86 (Winter/Spring 2018): 1–8. “The Franco-American monument in Québec City lists 168 New England communities that were important migrant destinations, including twenty-one in Vermont. That list is nowhere near exhaustive.”

Pre-Famine Irish in Vermont

Pre-Famine Irish in Vermont

V. E. Feeney, “Pre-Famine Irish in Vermont, 1815–1844,” Vermont History, 74 (Summer/Fall 2006): 101–126. “On the eve of the immense migration of Irish spawned by the Great Famine of the late 1840s there was already a significant Irish presence in the Green Mountain State.”

Making home pay: Italian and Scottish boardinghouse keepers in Barre, 1880-1918

Making home pay: Italian and Scottish boardinghouse keepers in Barre, 1880-1918

Susan Richards, “Making home pay: Italian and Scottish boardinghouse keepers in Barre, 1880-1918,” Vermont History, 74 (Winter/Spring 2006): 48–66. “From 1880 to 1910 between 45 and 51 percent of Barre’s working women earned income from taking in boarders. The high numbers of Barre boardinghouse keepers made it distinctive among communities of its size.”

Maartje L. K. Melchiors, History of a Vermont Granite Town.

Maartje L. K. Melchiors, History of a Vermont Granite Town.

This is a pictoral history. “The rapidly growing population was fueled by the influx of immigrants from Europe who came to Vermont in search of fortune and a better life. The Scottish were the first immigrants to arrive in Barre followed by the Italians…”

Liberian Immigrants in Rhode Island

Liberian Immigrants in Rhode Island

P. Khalil Saucuer, Liberian Immigrants in Rhode Island: The Trauma, the Bliss, and the Dilemma,” 2011. “This paper locates Rhode Island as the hub of Liberian presence in the US and explicates the basis of their concentration in that region. It recognizes the complexity of the dilemma that Liberian migrants face in the US, and silhouettes this against the backdrop of poverty and insecurity of lives and property in Liberia.”

The Contributions of New Americans in Rhode Island

The Contributions of New Americans in Rhode Island

New American Economy Report, “The Contributions of New Americans in Rhode Island,” August 2016. “Though it is our nation’s smallest state, Rhode Island has become a destination of choice for many newly arrived immigrants over the past several decades. In 1990, immigrants represented 9.5 percent of the state’s total population. By 2010, that share had risen to 12.4 percent. Between 2010 and 2014, Rhode Island’s immigrant population grew by almost 7,000 people, increasing in size by 5.2 percent.”