The Contributions of New Americans in Vermont

The Contributions of New Americans in Vermont

New American Economy Report, 2016. “Today Vermont is home to more than 24,000 immigrants. These new Americans play outsize roles as everything from food service managers to computer programmers. For many business owners, such immigrant workers have been a vital reason why their businesses have been able to thrive in recent years.”

Immigrants and Immigration in the Ocean State​

Immigrants and Immigration in the Ocean State

Alexandra Filindra and Shanna Pearson-Merkowitz, “Immigrants and Immigration in the Ocean State: History, Demography, Public Opinion and Policy Responses,” 2014. From the research: The immigrant population of Rhode Island exceeded the national average through the 1970s but today tracks the national average. In earlier eras, most immigrants to Rhode Island came from Europe but today, the fastest growing immigrant groups are Latinos and Asians. The Latino immigrant population of Rhode Island is quite distinct from other states because it largely consists of Caribbean rather than Mexican or Central American immigrants.”

LITHUANIANS of Worcester, Massachusetts: A Socio-Historic Glimpse at Marriage Records

LITHUANIANS of Worcester, Massachusetts: A Socio-Historic Glimpse at Marriage Records

Rev. William Wolkovich-Valkavicius, “LITHUANIANS of Worcester, Massachusetts: A Socio-Historic Glimpse at Marriage Records, 1910-1915 AND 1930-1934,” Lithuanian Quarterly Journal of Arts and Sciences, Vol. 26, no. 2, Summer 1980. “The purpose of this paper is to inspect the assimilational experience of one such unpublicized minority, the Lithuanians as they lived in the urban industrial setting of Worcester, Massachusetts by examining marriage records of two multiple-year intervals occurring two and one half decades apart.”

To Be an Homme de Famille in Petit-Canada

To Be an Homme de Famille in Petit-Canada

Florence Mae Waldron, “To Be an Homme de Famille in Petit-Canada: Ethnicity and National Identity among New England’s Working-Class Migrant Men from Quebec, 1880-1920, ” The Historical Society 2008 Conference. From the paper: “Approximately one million French Canadians left Canada for the United States from the mid- nineteenth through the early twentieth centuries, nearly three-quarters of them (720,000) from 1870 to 1930. This exodus of one in three Quebec residents forever reshaped the landscape both of rural Quebec and of the U.S. cities to which these migrants flocked. Many of them went to New England, where jobs were far more numerous in the northeast’s growing industrial…”

Understanding Refugees in Worcester, MA

Understanding Refugees in Worcester, MA

Clark University, Clark Digital Commons and the Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise, 2015. From the study: “Worcester, Massachusetts serves as the entry point to America for more refugees than any other municipality in Massachusetts, with more than 2,000 refugees settling there between 2007 and 2012. However, there has been a lack of information about how the livelihoods and experiences of refugees differ from those of the foreign-born population…”

Foreign-Born Population of Worcester, MA – Assessing the Contributions of a Diverse Community

Foreign-Born Population of Worcester, MA - Assessing the Contributions of a Diverse Community

Christina Citino and Molly Fenton, “Foreign-Born Population of Worcester, MA – Assessing the Contributions of a Diverse Community,” UMass Donahue Institute, September 2015. 

From the report: “As with most New England mill towns, Worcester’s immigration history begins with successive waves of Europeans. In the mid-twentieth century, Worcester began receiving a large number of Latin American immigrants, peaking in the 1970s. Worcester has seen a surge in African and Asian immigrants since the 1990s, though Asian immigration has outpaced African arrivals since 2010. Most African immigrants emigrate from Ghana and Kenya, and Asian immigrants from Vietnam, China, and India. Currently, Worcester has more foreign-born residents than any other Massachusetts Gateway City.”

ASIA Comes to Main Street and may Learn to Speak Spanish: Globalization in a Poor Neighborhood in Worcester

ASIA Comes to Main Street and may Learn to Speak Spanish: Globalization in a Poor Neighborhood in Worcester

Kate Driscoll Derickson and Robert J.S. Ross, “ASIA Comes to Main Street and may Learn to Speak Spanish: Globalization in a Poor Neighborhood in Worcester,” Journal of World-Systems Research, Volume XIII, Number 2, 2008, 179-197. 

From the article: Walk just one block in either direction along Main Street in front of the Clark University campus in Worcester, Massachusetts, in the neighborhood known as Main South, and one cannot help but notice a series of Asian (Vietnamese) owned businesses – among them three Vietnamese or Vietnamese-Chinese restaurants, two Vietnamese groceries; a trinket shop that rents Asian videos. A bit farther on, more of the same type appear. A cluster of businesses owned by Asian immigrant entrepreneurs in a poor neighborhood with an even larger Latino population in a provincial city does require some explanation.”

The East Boston Immigration Station: A History

The East Boston Immigration Station: A History

The East Boston Immigration Station: A History, 2012. From the history: The East Boston Immigration Station (Immigration Station) at 287 Marginal St. was the only federally- constructed, purpose-built immigration facility in Boston’s long history of accepting new arrivals to the United States. Built in 1920, well after the highest number of immigrants had come through the Port of Boston, it functioned for 34 years as a detention center for the United States Immigration Service in Boston. Its sole function, like other federal detention centers in key United States ports of entry, was to provide a central location for further examination of incoming immigrants who had paper work which was not in order or were suspected of having a contagious disease.”

City of Boston, “Imagine All the People: Jamaicans in Boston”

City of Boston, “Imagine All the People: Jamaicans in Boston”

New Bostonians Series, 2016. From the report: “There have been three significant waves of Jamaican immigration to the United States since the beginning of the twentieth century. The first occurred between 1900 and 1924—when the National Origins Act severely restricted immigration to the U.S. Caribbean immigration to the United States would plummet from 10,630 in 1924 to 321 the following year.

The second wave picked up steam during World War II: starting in 1943, migrant workers were brought in to help with the U.S. war effort by working in agriculture. At first, a majority of migrants were directed to Florida, but many would relocate to other states. Many tobacco workers who were working in Connecticut chose to move to Boston and New York.”

City of Boston, “Imagine All the People: Vietnamese in Boston”

City of Boston, “Imagine All the People: Vietnamese in Boston”

New Bostonians Series, 2016. From the report: “The first significant wave of Vietnamese immigrants to the United States came in 1975 following the end of the Vietnam War and the collapse of the government of South Vietnam. The vast majority of Vietnamese who came to the United States in the years that followed came as refugees fleeing persecution and political oppression. Many who had worked for the U.S. government or were otherwise associated with the U.S. involvement in the war were evacuated by the military.”