City of Boston, “Imagine All the People: Chinese in Boston”

City of Boston, “Imagine All the People: Chinese in Boston”

New Bostonians Series, 2016. From the report: “The migration of Chinese individuals to Boston goes back over 100 years to the late 1800s when the first Chinese residents settled in what is now known as Boston’s Chinatown, centered on Beach Street and bordered by the Boston Common, Downtown Crossing, the South End and the Massachusetts Turnpike. Chinese immigrants who first settled in the area came from California, which had long been a popular destination for Chinese immigrants. Most came to Boston to flee anti-Chinese sentiment in California.

City of Boston, “Imagine all the people: Haitian immigrants in Boston”

City of Boston, “Imagine all the people: Haitian immigrants in Boston”

New Bostonians Series, 2009. From the article: The origin of the Haitian community in Massachusetts goes back to the late 1950s and the early 1960s when some Haitians fled the dictatorial regime of Franois Duvalier (Papa Doc). Massachusetts has the third largest Haitian community in the United States, after Florida and New York. According to the 2007 Census Bureau…there are an estimated 41,000 Haitians living in Massachusetts today. Boston’s Haitian-born immigrants settled in various parts of Boston, with the highest concentrations in Mattapan, along Blue Hill Avenue, as well as Roxbury, Dorchester, and Hyde Park.

A Portrait of New England’s Immigrants​

A Portrait of New England’s Immigrants

Antoniya Owens, “A Portrait of New England’s Immigrants,” New England Public Policy Center Research Reports, 2008. “This research report uses the most recent available data to construct a detailed demographic, labor, and socioeconomic portrait of New England’s immigrants. It is the latest in a series of publications from the Center on the movement of people into and out of our region.”

Who are New England Immigrants

Who are New England Immigrants

Mamie Marcus and Ricardo Borgos, “Who are New England Immigrants,” Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, Fall 2004. From the report: “Given the relative size of the region’s immigrant population, it is an understandable omission—less than 5 percent of the 31 million foreign-born persons in the United States live in the six New England states. But for New Englanders, these 1.4 million immigrants make up nearly 10 percent of the population, and they significantly shape the region’s economy, culture, and character.”

Maine Center for Economic Policy, “The Growing Latin American Influence: Opportunities for Maine’s Economy”


Maine Center for Economic Policy, “The Growing Latin American Influence:
Opportunities for Maine’s Economy”

The face of Maine is changing. Maine and Vermont still remain the whitest states in the nation. However, the number of foreign-born people living in Maine rose 6% between 2006 to 2007, while the immigrant population nationwide grew by just 1.4%… Immigrants contribute to the Maine economy in multiple ways; by paying taxes, filling job vacancies, starting new businesses, harvesting crops, participating in civic activities, consuming goods and services, and revitalizing communities.


Open Link

The Contributions of New Americans in Maine

The Contributions of New Americans in Maine

New American Economy Report, “The Contributions of New Americans in Maine,” August 2016. “Today Maine is home to roughly 49,000 immigrants. These new Americans play outsize roles as everything from food service managers to computer programmers. For many business owners, such immigrant workers have been a vital reason why their businesses have been able to thrive in recent years.”

The Hamilton Project: “A Dozen Facts About Immigration”

The Hamilton Project: “A Dozen Facts About Immigration”

“The United States has been shaped by successive waves of immigration from the arrival of the first colonists through the present day. Immigration has wide-ranging impacts on society and culture, and its economic effects are no less substantial. By changing population levels and population growth, immigration augments both supply and demand in the economy. Immigrants are more likely to work (and to be working-age); they also tend to hold different occupations and educational degrees than natives. By the second generation (the native-born children of immigrants), though, the economic outcomes of immigrant communities exhibit striking convergence toward those of native communities.