Statue commemorating Lebanese immigrants in Halifax, Nova Scotia

Statue commemorating Lebanese immigrants in Halifax, Nova Scotia

It portrays a Lebanese traveler wearing traditional clothes. The plaque of the statue read as follows: “This monument is a universal symbol of a proud, strong, and globally united Lebanese community. The statue honors the early Lebanese settlers who, 130 years ago, established a presence in this country, sewing the bonds of loyalty, faith, and perseverance. We are thankful to our Nova Scotia community and for the enduring friendships built in our new home, Canada.”

Bridge of Tears

Bridge of Tears

Roadside stone Gaelic monument is located where emigrants departing to America and/or Canada parted with family members remaining in Ireland, perhaps never to see one another again, with the emigrants just beginning a long walk to get to the ships and family members remaining in Ireland walking back to their homes in the opposite direction.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Monuments_and_memorials_to_immigrants#/media/File:Bridge_of_Tears_-_Roadside_stone_Gaelic_monument_-_geograph.org.uk_-_1185235.jpg

Cairn commemorating the arrival of Scottish immigrants in Cape Breton

Photo and description by Haydn Blackey

Cairn commemorating the arrival of Scottish immigrants in Cape Breton

The plaque is in English and Gaelic and the English text reads: On 3 August 1802, the 242 ton ship “Northern Friends” arrived in Sydney Harbour with 415 settlers from Scotland. This marked the first emigration directly from Scotland to Cape Breton and formed the vanguard of the great migration which gave this Island its Scottish character. Erected through the co-operation of the Old Sydney Society and the Gaelic Society of Cape Breton, and unveiled by the Honourable Vincent J. MacLean, Minister of Lands and Forests, October 1977.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Memorial_cairn_to_Scottish_immigrants_Sydney_Nova_Scotia_August_2011.jpg

Black Rock: Stone commemorating 6,000 immigrant deaths, Point St. Charles, QC

Black Rock: Stone commemorating 6,000 immigrant deaths, Point St. Charles, QC

The Black Rock was placed in 1859 near the entrance of the Victoria Bridge, in the middle of a cemetery where thousands of Irish immigrants were buried, victims of typhus in 1847-1848. In 1902, after the cemetery was moved, the commemorative monument was placed in St. Patrick Square, beside the Lachine Canal. It was, however, returned to the entrance of the bridge in 1912, where it remains to this day.

Bracero Monument

Bracero Monument

Bracero Monument honoring ‘braceros,’ Mexican migrant workers, unveiled in downtown L.A. created by artist Dan Medina, 51, as part of a $3.2-million streetscape and pedestrian improvement project that also highlights Native American, African American and immigrant cultures from many L.A. communities, in Migrant’s Bend Plaza in downtown Los Angeles. It measures about 20 feet tall. A bronze migrant worker holds el cortito, a short-handled hoe that required field workers to be bent over for their 10- to 12-hour shifts. To the left of the worker, his wife holds their son, clutching a toy Ford truck in one arm while stretching out the other arm in search of his father. To the right, there’s a pile of workers’ tools and other symbols depicting how migrants were exploited.

The Immigrant

The Immigrant

Opposite The Slave in the Central Terrace of the Ellen Phillips Samuel Memorial is Heinz Warneke’s representation of The Immigrant, commissioned by the Fairmount Park Art Association (now the Association for Public Art). Born in Germany, Warneke himself became an immigrant to the United States at the age of 28. Well known for his animal sculptures, such as Cow Elephant and Calf, he also created monumental human figures for a number of public sites, including government buildings in Washington, D.C. In contrast to the enthusiasm expressed in Sterne’s Welcoming to Freedom, Warneke’s Immigrant is a rather melancholy figure. Taken together, the works by Sterne, Sardeau, and Warneke suggest both the promise and the difficulties of American freedom.

Monument to New Immigrants

Monument to New Immigrants

Tania Bruguera’s piece is a meditation on the history and present-day significance of immigration in Philadelphia and beyond. She proposed a physically incomplete statue of an immigrant child—unmarked by race, ethnicity, or gender. As Bruguera stated, “the statue is not (meant) to represent a particular community, but all immigrants…they are not always in one place; part of them is somewhere else, in their home country.” For this project, Bruguera collaborated with students and staff from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts’ Sculpture Department to create a series of identical clay sculptures placed outside on Lenfest Plaza, in line with a view of City Hall. After days of weathering and outdoor conditions, the unfired sculpture was meant to “deteriorate and slowly disappear,” upon which another sculpture would take its place. This cycle would repeat throughout the exhibition until the series of fabricated sculptures fully disappeared.

The Immigrants

The Immigrants

This is part of NYC Parks’ Historical Signs Project. Sculptor Luis Sanguino (b. 1934) celebrates the diversity of New York City and the struggle of immigrants in this heroic-sized bronze figural group. The sculpture depicts figures of various ethnic groups and eras, including an Eastern European Jew, a freed African slave, a priest, and a worker. The figures’ expressive poses emphasize the struggle and toil inherent in the experience of the immigrant or dislocated person. The sculpture is located at the south end of the Eisenhower Mall in Battery Park, which served as a processing facility for newly arrived immigrants from 1855 to 1890, when construction began on a larger, more remote facility at nearby Ellis Island. The piece was donated by Samuel Rudin (1896–1975), who commissioned the sculpture in the early 1970s, intending it to be installed near Castle Clinton as a memorial to his parents, who, as it is noted on the plinth, emigrated to the United States in the late-19th century. Although Rudin died in 1975, Rudin’s family took up the campaign to install the sculpture at the park, and it eventually was dedicated on May 4, 1983.

“Bloody Monday”

"Bloody Monday"

Election day, Aug. 6, 1855, known as Bloody Monday due to riots led by “Know-Nothing” mobs. This political party was anti-Catholic and nativist. Attacks on German immigrants east of downtown and Irish in the west caused at least 22 deaths, arson, and looting. Catholic Cathedral of the Assumption & St. Martin’s Church were threatened with destruction. American (Know-Nothing) Party. This party feared that Catholic immigrants from Germany and Ireland threatened Protestantism and democracy. By 1854, the party claimed a million members nationwide and led Jefferson Co. govt. They split over slavery and by the end of the Civil War they had vanished from politics in Louisville and Jefferson Co., Kentucky.

Vietnamese Boat People Monument

Vietnamese Boat People Monument

Description: Cam Ai Tran and Hap Tu Thai and their two children escaped Vietnam by boat in 1979. Thirteen others on the same boat died and were buried at sea. Tran and Thai are now the publishers of the “Saigon Times”, based in Rosemead, California. For ten years they worked tirelessly to build a memorial to the Boat People, including the tens of thousands who died at sea. In the Spring of 2009 the Vietnamese Boat People Monument was dedicated in Westminster Memorial Park’s Asian Garden of Peaceful Eternity.