THE FINNS OF NEWPORT: Finnish Immigrant History in Newport, New Hampshire

THE FINNS OF NEWPORT: Finnish Immigrant History in Newport, New Hampshire

Kerrin McTernan and Patrick Driscoll, Keene State College, “THE FINNS OF NEWPORT: Finnish Immigrant History in Newport, New Hampshire.”  “As you navigate through this website you will find yourself immersed in what is, as far as we know at this time, the first-ever digitally documented history of Finnish immigrants in New Hampshire, and specifically in Newport, the small town in Sullivan County…” 

Uprooted: Heartache and Hope in New Hampshire

Uprooted: Heartache and Hope in New Hampshire

Uprooted is a 30-minute documentary based on interviews collected during the New Hampshire Humanities Fences & Neighbors initiative on immigration. Sara Withers organized and conducted nearly 40 oral history interviews that served as the basis for the documentary. It tells the story of five refugees who escaped from war-torn countries to resettle in New Hampshire. The film explores what it means to be a refugee and how it feels to make a new life in a strange place, often without English language skills, family, a job, or community contacts.” 

American Immigration Council, “Immigrants in New Hampshire Fact Sheet,” October 2017.

American Immigration Council, “Immigrants in New Hampshire Fact Sheet,” October 2017.

“New Hampshire has a small but growing immigrant community. While only 6 percent of the state’s population was born in another country, foreign-born residents make up a vital, educated share of New Hampshire’s labor force. For example, 44 percent of immigrants in New Hampshire possess a college degree or higher, while 90 percent report speaking English well.” 

Maine Memory Network

Maine Memory Network

The Maine Memory Network, a project of the Maine Historical Society, provides access to thousands of historical items belonging to over 270 organizations from across Maine. The expansive site provides free online access to tens of thousands of primary source materials and hundreds of online exhibits; a virtual textbook on Maine history; lesson plans; and practical resources for both teachers and students. 

Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. “Migration and Refugee Lesson Plans.”

Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. “Migration and Refugee Lesson Plans.”

According to the 2015 International Migration Report from the United Nations, “The number of international migrants worldwide has continued to grow rapidly over the past fifteen years reaching 244 million in 2015, up from 222 million in 2010 and 173 million in 2000.” Forced migration patterns, and the many factors that cause them, are at the heart of many of the world’s 21st century challenges. A dozen lesson plans present entry points to a diversity of stories reflecting the human impact of migration. Note: “Some lessons were written by members of our education team, and others were written and shared by our community of educators. This page will be updated regularly to feature new lessons exploring issues facing the environment, so please check back.” Grades 7 – 12.

Scholastic. “Refugee Discussion Guide.”

Scholastic. “Refugee Discussion Guide.”

Pre-reading and post-reading activities and questions for discussing key ideas and details, craft and structure, and integration of knowledge and ideas in reading Alan Gratz’s book Refugee. About the book. Three young people are looking for refuge, a place for themselves and their families to live in peace. Separated by decades in time and by oceans in geography, their stories share similar emotional traumas and desperate situations and, at the end, connect in astounding ways. Josef in 1930s Nazi Germany, Isabel in 1990s Cuba, and Mahmoud in present-day Syria — all three hang on to their hope for a new tomorrow in the face of harrowing dangers. Grades 3-5 and 6 – 8.

Immigration History. “Teaching About Refugees and Asylum.”

Immigration History. “Teaching About Refugees and Asylum.”

A compilation of material designed to teach high school students about the history of refugees and asylum seekers. Objectives include: students will be able to identify asylum as a path to lawful status in the United States and explain the main criteria for receiving asylum; students will be able to evaluate the asylum application process; students will learn about how you can stay in the United States if you are in deportation proceedings, called asylum. The site also contains a chronology of laws determining refugee and asylum status in the United States.

The United Nations Refugee Agency. “Teaching About Refugees.”

The United Nations Refugee Agency. “Teaching About Refugees.”

With forced displacement reaching historic levels, schools all over the world are welcoming increasing numbers of refugee children. Teachers are facing new challenges in making sense of forced displacement and its complexities. Refugees and migrants regularly make headlines and the internet is bustling with information on the topic. Explaining the situation of refugees and migrants to primary and secondary school children has become part of many educators’ daily work. On this UNHCR Teaching About Refugees page you can find free-of-charge and adaptable UNHCR teaching materials on refugees, asylum, migration and statelessness and a section dedicated to professional development and guidance for primary and secondary school teachers on including refugee children in their classes.

Education World

Education World

Best Instructional Videos on Immigration. Education World has scoured the Internet to bring you the most insightful and comprehensive educational videos on the topic of immigration. For each video, we include a description and grade level.