Best Children’s Books. “Immigrant Stories in Early American History.”

Best Children’s Books. “Immigrant Stories in Early American History.”

Any day is a good day for a story about immigrant experiences, since the characters in these books embody hope, sacrifice and determination–character traits we’d like to see all our students embrace. The children’s books discussed here are great resources for your immigration lesson plans. Some would make for great read alouds, others would be perfect for required student reading lists. This selection of books will help bring the immigrant experience to life for your students. Grades K – 5

A Picture’s Worth: Analyzing Historical Photographs in the Elementary Grades

A Picture’s Worth: Analyzing Historical Photographs in the Elementary Grades

SocialStudies.org. “A Picture’s Worth: Analyzing Historical Photographs in the Elementary Grades.” A Lesson Plan for Analyzing an Authentic Photograph. When using historical pictures in the classroom, teachers should assume that students will need the most help drawing their observations together to reach conclusions about the lives of people at a particular time. Sets of photographs—along with probing questions and graphic organizers—can help students develop these important skills of authentic historical inquiry.

Scholastic. Immigration: Stories of Yesterday and Today

Scholastic. Immigration: Stories of Yesterday and Today

Immigration: Stories of Yesterday and Today shares with students the many reasons people come to America and how they’ve helped create our rich and diverse country. Through several learning activities (mostly for grades 3–8) at this site including oral histories of recent and historic immigrants, an Ellis Island history lesson, data analysis, research skills, and several graphing activities, students get a comprehensive look at immigration. Take a tour of Ellis Island, explore an interactive immigration timeline, and meet young immigrants in this online activity!

Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation

Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation

Education Resources and Curriculum Guides for elementary, middle, and high school students alongside articles, and poetry for anyone teaching or learning about the history of Angel Island, the West Coast version of Ellis Island. Angel Island Immigration Station’s curriculum guides, called ‘Immigrant Journeys,’ provide strategies and background material designed for teachers of Grades 3-12. These guides contain lessons, student worksheets, primary source documents from the National Archives, historical photographs, and list of resources to introduce students to the experience of immigrants on Angel Island.

Scholastic. Exploring Immigration History with data.

Scholastic. Exploring Immigration History with data.

Questions include: What is the total number of immigrants who came to the United States from 1820 to 2010? Choose a decade, and then use your research skills to find out what the U.S. population was at that time. How does the overall population compare to the number of people who arrived in that decade? Data. Maps. Suggested classroom activities and projects.

The Tenement Museum

The Tenement Museum

(New York City). With Tenement Museum resources, students become historians. Using teacher-designed, teacher-tested lesson plans, students engage in inquiry and learn to use critical thinking to interpret objects, oral histories, and primary sources, while making history relevant to today. Classroom resources support Social Studies and English Language Arts curriculum.

Teaching Tolerance.org

Teaching Tolerance.org

Tell complex stories about immigration in the United States and find strategies for serving immigrant students and families. Our resources can help you teach accurately about immigration and offer undocumented and ELL students resources and support. Address immigration myths, research changing demographics and explore the value of a diverse society.

Independent Lens

Independent Lens

From PBS.org’s The New Americans series. These lesson plans for The New Americans for grades 7-12 are available on the Web or as PDF documents. The PDF format provides a downloadable printed version of the lesson plan; Adobe Acrobat is required. The New Americans Series Guide and Activity Kit for higher education settings, including ESOL and professional development, is available through the Community Connections Project at itvs.org.

Teaching Immigration History

Teaching Immigration History

From teachinghistory.org. National History Education Clearinghouse. This is the link to a large collection of teacher resources including photographs, videos, and primary source documents for teaching immigration history.

Emerging America: Immigrant History Through Primary Sources

Emerging America: Immigrant History Through Primary Sources

The Emerging America – Accessing Inquiry approach to making history and social studies accessible to all learners emphasizes the importance of showcasing the historical contributions of people with challenges that students can relate to. This includes the challenges of being an immigrant.