Maine History Online, “Peopling Maine.”

Maine History Online, “Peopling Maine.”

The largest numbers of 19th century immigrants came from Canada and came at a time when industry provided job opportunities in the United States and farms and small communities in Quebec and New Brunswick offered lives of struggle to many residents. In addition, a fluctuating border along the St. John and St. Croix Rivers had stranded relatives on both sides for decades; many French Canadians came to join their American kin.

American Immigration Council Fact Sheet, “Immigrants in Maine”

American Immigration Council Fact Sheet, “Immigrants in Maine"

From the site: “Maine has a small but growing immigrant community, much of which emigrated from Canada. While only 3 percent of Maine residents are immigrants, over 9 percent are native-born Americans with at least one immigrant parent. Foreign-born Mainers make up a vital, educated share of the labor force: over a third of immigrants in the state possess a college or higher degree and 92 percent report speaking English well. Across sectors, immigrants help support Maine’s economy—from working as artists, entertainers, and athletes, to accounting for over 25 percent of the state’s extraction industry employees.

Connecticut History Illustrated

Connecticut History Illustrated

The site contains images for 24 items as a sampling of resources relevant to immigration available in Connecticut History Illustrated. At the site you can do searches for particular ethnic groups using terms such as Italian American or Chinese American, and/or use the “Topics” terms to the left of the search results to refine your search.

Connecticut Humanities: Early 19th-Century Immigration in Connecticut

Early 19th-Century Immigration in Connecticut

Early 19th-Century Immigration in Connecticut. Numerous factors contributed to the growth of Connecticut in the decades following American independence. Among these were the state’s abundant supplies of water for powering industry, its navigable rivers, natural resources, proximity to major metropolitan areas, and access to the sea. Perhaps most important, however, were its people. After utilizing its citizens’ good old-fashioned “Yankee ingenuity” to lay the groundwork for industrialization, the human resources driving Connecticut’s growth in the early 19th century came increasingly from overseas. Waves of immigrants from northern and western Europe helped the state grow and prosper and paved the way for the massive influx of immigrants that occurred in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

The We Are America Project

The We Are America Project

‘The We Are America Project’ is working with teachers and young people across the country to define what it means to be American, and to spark a new national conversation about American identity today led by the next generation. About the site: “We are eighteen students from Lowell High School, located in Lowell, Massachusetts, working together with our teacher, Jessica Lander.  During the 2018-2019 school year, we learned together with Ms. Lander in a course called the Seminar on American Diversity…”

Global Boston: A Portal to the Region’s Immigrant Past and Present

Global Boston: A Portal to the Region’s Immigrant Past and Present

Global Boston is a digital project chronicling the history of immigration to greater Boston since the early nineteenth century. Examining different time periods and ethnic groups, the site features capsule histories, photographs, maps, documents, and oral histories documenting the history of a city where immigrants have long been a vital force in shaping economic, social and political life. ‘Global Boston’ is a digital project based at Boston College.

Tenement Museum

Tenement Museum

We tell the stories of 97 Orchard Street. Built on Manhattan’s Lower East Side in 1863, this tenement apartment building was home to nearly 7000 working class immigrants.