Teaching About Asylum Seekers and Refugees. Virtual Lesson Plans.

Teaching About Asylum Seekers and Refugees. Virtual Lesson Plans.

Lesson plans aimed at spreading awareness on refugees and asylum seekers, as there are more now than after World War II. Students will gain an understanding of what it means to be a refugee in the 21st century, explore encounters of refugees in the resettlement process, and expose students to different organizations that work with asylum seekers.

Asylum Hangover? Governments Seek to Narrow Avenues for Humanitarian Protection

Asylum Hangover? Governments Seek to Narrow Avenues for Humanitarian Protection

Migration Policy Institute. Sara Staedicke and Michelle Mittelstadt, “Asylum Hangover? Governments Seek to Narrow Avenues for Humanitarian Protection,” December 2018. From the article: “Faced with absorbing vast numbers of asylum seekers who headed to Europe during the 2015-16 migration crisis and the ongoing arrival of much smaller, but steady flows of Central Americans at the U.S.-Mexico border, EU Member States and the United States in 2018 took or explored steps to narrow asylum and harden policies.”

Refugees and Asylees in the United States

Refugees and Asylees in the United States

Migration Policy Institute. Brittany Blizzard and Jeanne Batalova, “Refugees and Asylees in the United States,” June 2019. From the article: “Global displacement reached a record high of 68.5 million people by the end of 2017, according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Approximately 25.4 million of these individuals were formally designated as refugees, 40 million were internally displaced persons, and 3.1 million were asylum seekers.”

International Justice Resource Center. Asylum and the Rights of Refugees.

International Justice Resource Center. Asylum and the Rights of Refugees.

International Justice Resource Center. Asylum and the Rights of Refugees. From the site: “States have been granting protection to individuals and groups fleeing persecution for centuries; however, the modern refugee regime is largely the product of the second half of the twentieth century. Like international human rights law, modern refugee law has its origins in the aftermath of World War II as well as the refugee crises of the interwar years that preceded it.” The site has an excellent online resource hub.

Habitat for Humanity Great Britain. “Refugees, Asylum Seekers & Migrants: A Crucial Difference.”

Habitat for Humanity Great Britain. “Refugees, Asylum Seekers & Migrants: A Crucial Difference.”

From the site: “An asylum seeker is someone who claims to be a refugee but whose claim hasn’t been evaluated. This person would have applied for asylum on the grounds that returning to his or her country would lead to persecution on account of race, religion, nationality or political beliefs. Someone is an asylum seeker for so long as their application is pending. So not every asylum seeker will be recognised as a refugee, but every refugee is initially an asylum seeker.”

“Refugees, Asylum-Seekers, and Migrants, Amnesty International.

“Refugees, Asylum-Seekers, and Migrants, Amnesty International.

From the site: “Every day, all over the world, people make one of the most difficult decisions in their lives: to leave their homes in search of a safer, better life. Most people in the world have had the experience of leaving the place where they grew up. Maybe they will only move as far as the next village or city. But for some people, they will need to leave their country entirely – sometimes for a short time, but sometimes forever.

American Immigration Council. Asylum in the United States.

American Immigration Council. Asylum in the United States.

Each year, thousands of people arriving at our border or already in the United States apply for asylum, or protection from persecution. Asylum seekers must navigate a difficult and complex process that can involve multiple government agencies. Those granted asylum can apply to live in the United States permanently and gain a path to citizenship and can also apply for their spouse and children to join them in the United States. Material here provides an overview of the asylum system in the United States, including how asylum is defined, eligibility requirements, and the application process.