The Hamilton Project: “A Dozen Facts About Immigration”

The Hamilton Project: “A Dozen Facts About Immigration”

“The United States has been shaped by successive waves of immigration from the arrival of the first colonists through the present day. Immigration has wide-ranging impacts on society and culture, and its economic effects are no less substantial. By changing population levels and population growth, immigration augments both supply and demand in the economy. Immigrants are more likely to work (and to be working-age); they also tend to hold different occupations and educational degrees than natives. By the second generation (the native-born children of immigrants), though, the economic outcomes of immigrant communities exhibit striking convergence toward those of native communities.

Fighting Sons of Erin: Connecticut’s Irish Regiment in the Civil War​

Fighting Sons of Erin: Connecticut’s Irish Regiment in the Civil War

Diana McCain for Your Public Media, “Fighting Sons of Erin: Connecticut’s Irish Regiment in the Civil War.” On battlefields from Virginia to Louisiana, the soldiers of Connecticut’s Ninth Regiment Volunteer Infantry marched into combat against Confederate forces under a regimental flag unlike any other from the state: a blue banner emblazoned with a golden harp on a field of emerald green dotted with shamrocks and bearing the motto “Erin Go Bragh.” The symbols and the slogan proclaimed the unit as Connecticut’s “Irish Regiment,” composed of 1,200 first- and second-generation Irish for whom fighting to preserve the Union…”

Connecticut Humanities: “Witamy to Little Poland! – A Thriving Neighborhood in New Britain.”

Connecticut Humanities: “Witamy to Little Poland! – A Thriving Neighborhood in New Britain.”

In the late 19th century, Polish immigrants started arriving in New Britain in large numbers to begin new lives working in the city’s many factories. Consequently, by 1930, one-quarter of the city’s population was of Polish ancestry. The majority settled in and around the Broad Street area, near Sacred Heart Church, and set up homes and businesses that created a strong cultural, social, and religious community. Just about a mile long, this section of Broad Street became known by residents as “Little Poland.”

Guide to the Waterbury (CT) Area Immigrant Oral History Collection, University of Connecticut Urban and Community Studies Program, 2003-2011.

Guide to the Waterbury (CT) Area Immigrant Oral History Collection, University of Connecticut Urban and Community Studies Program, 2003-2011.

“Guide to the Waterbury (CT) Area Immigrant Oral History Collection, University of Connecticut Urban and Community Studies Program, 2003-2011.” UConn University Libraries, Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, 2017.