Library of Congress. “Immigration History First Hand.”

Library of Congress. “Immigration History First Hand.”

Designed to provide elementary children with experiences which enable them to begin understanding primary sources. Students move from personal artifacts to the vast Library of Congress online collections and learn how archival collections are organized, how to interpret artifacts and documents, how to use primary sources to tell a real story and how to do online research.

Library of Congress. “Immigration and Migration: Today and During the Great Depression”

Library of Congress. “Immigration and Migration: Today and During the Great Depression”

Eight lesson plans at this site). Is there a novel in every person? Are there stories that have never been told because they seemed unimportant? What is the value of the lives of people who will never be famous or have their biographies written? Students address these questions through activities using oral history methods and investigating life in the 1930s. They compare immigration/migration experiences of their families to those of people living through the Great Depression using interviews with parents, and photographs, films, and documents from the Library of Congress and other sources.

Teaching New Scholarship Primary Source Documents

Teaching New Scholarship Primary Source Documents

Analyzing the History of Immigration in America: Reflections of New Immigrants in American Schools (Are we the same or different from those before us?) This unit promotes reflection on the value of diverse perspectives about immigrant experiences. The underlying goal is for students to understand that the United States is a nation of immigrants with a variety of backgrounds. These immigrants have different reasons for coming to the United States and have unique stories about their journeys that need to be shared with others. Students will experience what immigration was like 100-150 years ago and analyze a collection of images from the past to reflect on their personal immigration experiences, discussing what has changed in immigration today. Grades 4 – 6.

Using Photographs to Teach Social Justice: Exposing Anti-Immigration Sentiment

Using Photographs to Teach Social Justice: Exposing Anti-Immigration Sentiment

Teaching Tolerance: “Using Photographs to Teach Social Justice: Exposing Anti-Immigration Sentiment.” The photo shows an anti-immigration protest on the campus of the University of California at Berkeley. People with picket signs are arguing for stricter immigration policies that would make it a felony to be in the United States illegally. In this lesson, you will analyze two photographs, each dealing with a different element of identity. This is part of the Using Photographs to Teach Social Justice series. Grades 6-8 and 9-12.

Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation

Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation

Education Resources and Curriculum Guides for elementary, middle, and high school students alongside articles, and poetry for anyone teaching or learning about the history of Angel Island, the West Coast version of Ellis Island. Angel Island Immigration Station’s curriculum guides, called ‘Immigrant Journeys,’ provide strategies and background material designed for teachers of Grades 3-12. These guides contain lessons, student worksheets, primary source documents from the National Archives, historical photographs, and list of resources to introduce students to the experience of immigrants on Angel Island.

5 Tips For Teaching Immigration to Elementary Students

5 Tips For Teaching Immigration to Elementary Students

Population Education. Pete Bailey, “5 Tips For Teaching Immigration to Elementary Students,” October, 2019. “

Immigration is a hot button issue in the United States and around the world. Therefore, it is likely that students as young as elementary school have heard about immigration in some way or another. Because students may have varying background knowledge on the subject, it is important to fill in any gaps and correct misconceptions about why people immigrate, who immigrants are, and why immigration has always been a hallmark of the United States.”

Scholastic. Exploring Immigration History with data.

Scholastic. Exploring Immigration History with data.

Questions include: What is the total number of immigrants who came to the United States from 1820 to 2010? Choose a decade, and then use your research skills to find out what the U.S. population was at that time. How does the overall population compare to the number of people who arrived in that decade? Data. Maps. Suggested classroom activities and projects.

The Tenement Museum

The Tenement Museum

(New York City). With Tenement Museum resources, students become historians. Using teacher-designed, teacher-tested lesson plans, students engage in inquiry and learn to use critical thinking to interpret objects, oral histories, and primary sources, while making history relevant to today. Classroom resources support Social Studies and English Language Arts curriculum.

Teaching Tolerance.org

Teaching Tolerance.org

Tell complex stories about immigration in the United States and find strategies for serving immigrant students and families. Our resources can help you teach accurately about immigration and offer undocumented and ELL students resources and support. Address immigration myths, research changing demographics and explore the value of a diverse society.