Swedish Immigration to North America

Swedish Immigration to North America

Dag Blanck, “Swedish Immigration to North America,” Swenson Swedish Immigration Research Center, 2009. From the article: “By 1910 the position of the Midwest as a place of residence for the Swedish immigrants and their children was still strong, but had weakened. Fifty-four percent of the Swedish immigrants and their children now lived in these states, with Minnesota and Illinois dominating. Fifteen percent lived in the East, where the immigrants were drawn to industrial areas in New England. New York City and Worcester, Massachusetts, were two leading destinations.”

LITHUANIANS of Worcester, Massachusetts: A Socio-Historic Glimpse at Marriage Records

LITHUANIANS of Worcester, Massachusetts: A Socio-Historic Glimpse at Marriage Records

Rev. William Wolkovich-Valkavicius, “LITHUANIANS of Worcester, Massachusetts: A Socio-Historic Glimpse at Marriage Records, 1910-1915 AND 1930-1934,” Lithuanian Quarterly Journal of Arts and Sciences, Vol. 26, no. 2, Summer 1980. “The purpose of this paper is to inspect the assimilational experience of one such unpublicized minority, the Lithuanians as they lived in the urban industrial setting of Worcester, Massachusetts by examining marriage records of two multiple-year intervals occurring two and one half decades apart.”

To Be an Homme de Famille in Petit-Canada

To Be an Homme de Famille in Petit-Canada

Florence Mae Waldron, “To Be an Homme de Famille in Petit-Canada: Ethnicity and National Identity among New England’s Working-Class Migrant Men from Quebec, 1880-1920, ” The Historical Society 2008 Conference. From the paper: “Approximately one million French Canadians left Canada for the United States from the mid- nineteenth through the early twentieth centuries, nearly three-quarters of them (720,000) from 1870 to 1930. This exodus of one in three Quebec residents forever reshaped the landscape both of rural Quebec and of the U.S. cities to which these migrants flocked. Many of them went to New England, where jobs were far more numerous in the northeast’s growing industrial…”

Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor, “Settlers and Immigrants.”

Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor, “Settlers and Immigrants.”

From the site: The story of the Blackstone Valley is the story of people at work. whether a Nipmuc warrior hunting along a pristine river, a Yankee craftsman inventing a new tool in his workshop, or a 12-year old girl from Quebec toiling at a loom, each added their voice, their sweat and their genius to the creation of the Blackstone Valley. Today, citizens from every corner of the world call the Blackstone Valley home. Here are just a few of their contributions to our tale.”

Understanding Refugees in Worcester, MA

Understanding Refugees in Worcester, MA

Clark University, Clark Digital Commons and the Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise, 2015. From the study: “Worcester, Massachusetts serves as the entry point to America for more refugees than any other municipality in Massachusetts, with more than 2,000 refugees settling there between 2007 and 2012. However, there has been a lack of information about how the livelihoods and experiences of refugees differ from those of the foreign-born population…”

Coming to Worcester: The city’s immigrant population has shifted in the last decade

Coming to Worcester: The city’s immigrant population has shifted in the last decade

Grant Welker, “Coming to Worcester: The city’s immigrant population has shifted in the last decade,” Worcester Business Journal, November 2018. From the article: “For a century starting in the 1870s, immigrants moving into Worcester almost exclusively came from Europe and North America. In the early days, they were largely from Ireland – which made up an overwhelming 70 percent of all Worcester foreign-born residents 150 years ago – followed by Canada and England. It’s much different today.”

A never-ending journey: The life and times of Worcester’s undocumented immigrants​

A never-ending journey: The life and times of Worcester’s undocumented immigrants

Gari De Ramos, “A never-ending journey: The life and times of Worcester’s undocumented immigrants,” Worcester Magazine, August 2019. From the article: “To profile the entire population of undocumented immigrants in Worcester is a near-impossible task because of the city’s diversity. Undocumented immigrants can be found in the public school system, Worcester’s many universities and somewhere behind the roughly 35% of foreign-owned businesses.”

Foreign-Born Population of Worcester, MA – Assessing the Contributions of a Diverse Community

Foreign-Born Population of Worcester, MA - Assessing the Contributions of a Diverse Community

Christina Citino and Molly Fenton, “Foreign-Born Population of Worcester, MA – Assessing the Contributions of a Diverse Community,” UMass Donahue Institute, September 2015. 

From the report: “As with most New England mill towns, Worcester’s immigration history begins with successive waves of Europeans. In the mid-twentieth century, Worcester began receiving a large number of Latin American immigrants, peaking in the 1970s. Worcester has seen a surge in African and Asian immigrants since the 1990s, though Asian immigration has outpaced African arrivals since 2010. Most African immigrants emigrate from Ghana and Kenya, and Asian immigrants from Vietnam, China, and India. Currently, Worcester has more foreign-born residents than any other Massachusetts Gateway City.”

ASIA Comes to Main Street and may Learn to Speak Spanish: Globalization in a Poor Neighborhood in Worcester

ASIA Comes to Main Street and may Learn to Speak Spanish: Globalization in a Poor Neighborhood in Worcester

Kate Driscoll Derickson and Robert J.S. Ross, “ASIA Comes to Main Street and may Learn to Speak Spanish: Globalization in a Poor Neighborhood in Worcester,” Journal of World-Systems Research, Volume XIII, Number 2, 2008, 179-197. 

From the article: Walk just one block in either direction along Main Street in front of the Clark University campus in Worcester, Massachusetts, in the neighborhood known as Main South, and one cannot help but notice a series of Asian (Vietnamese) owned businesses – among them three Vietnamese or Vietnamese-Chinese restaurants, two Vietnamese groceries; a trinket shop that rents Asian videos. A bit farther on, more of the same type appear. A cluster of businesses owned by Asian immigrant entrepreneurs in a poor neighborhood with an even larger Latino population in a provincial city does require some explanation.”