Asia on Main Street: Recent Immigration to Worcester, MA in New England Perspective

Asia on Main Street: Recent Immigration to Worcester, MA in New England Perspective

Robert Ross (Clark University), “Asia on Main Street: Recent Immigration to Worcester, MA in New England Perspective,” 2011. From the article: “Worcester, MA, a middle sized regional city in transition from a manufacturing to a service industry base, has been a home to immigrants since the late 19th Century. In the past Irish, Swedish, Armenian, and Italian immigrants followed the English settlers into the heart of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Later came Puerto Rican and Central American migrants. In the last decade something entirely new came to Worcester – immigrants from South and East Asia…”

North End History — The Irish Influx

North End History — The Irish Influx

Guild Nichols, “North End History — The Irish Influx,” 2020. From the site: “In an almost arithmetic progression: 2000 Irish were living in Boston in 1820, 5000 in 1825, 7000 in 1830, and between 1846 and 1855, 37,000 more Irish had fled Ireland for Boston. In 1847 alone 13,235 Irish emigrated to Boston. This was the year known as “Black 47” and was the most deadly year of Ireland’s Great Potato Famine or, as it was called in Gaelic, An Górta Mor or “The Great Hunger.”

North End History — Our Jewish Heritage

North End History — Our Jewish Heritage

Guild Nichols, “North End History — Our Jewish Heritage,” 2020. From the site: “Eastern European Jews began settling in the North End as early as 1870. By the early 1900s they comprised 6,300 or almost one-third of the entire neighborhood population. They settled in a modest enclave comprising several blocks along Salem Street. Many arriving Jews had skills related to the needle trades and were able to find work in the burgeoning clothing industries in Boston’s North and West Ends.”

North End History – The Italians

North End History – The Italians

Guild Nichols, “North End History – The Italians,” 2020. From the site: “The Italian masses that flowed into the North End on the heels of the departing Irish and at the apex of the Jewish settlement found a neighborhood in dire physical condition; a rundown, overcrowded slum of deteriorating tenement buildings. Like their predecessors, these newly-arrived Italian immigrants also had to contend with Bostonians’ disdain for foreigners.”

The East Boston Immigration Station: A History

The East Boston Immigration Station: A History

The East Boston Immigration Station: A History, 2012. From the history: The East Boston Immigration Station (Immigration Station) at 287 Marginal St. was the only federally- constructed, purpose-built immigration facility in Boston’s long history of accepting new arrivals to the United States. Built in 1920, well after the highest number of immigrants had come through the Port of Boston, it functioned for 34 years as a detention center for the United States Immigration Service in Boston. Its sole function, like other federal detention centers in key United States ports of entry, was to provide a central location for further examination of incoming immigrants who had paper work which was not in order or were suspected of having a contagious disease.”

“Brazilian Immigrants in the United States,” Migration Policy Institute

“Brazilian Immigrants in the United States,” Migration Policy Institute

Brittany Blizzard and Jeanne Batalova, “Brazilian Immigrants in the United States,” Migration Policy Institute, 2019. “Approximately 450,000 Brazilian immigrants resided in the United States in 2017, an increase of nearly one-third over a seven-year span that was marked by difficult conditions in Brazil, including a recession accompanied by high unemployment and inflation. Brazilians, who now represent 1 percent of the 44.5 million immigrants in the United States…”

Wyner Family Jewish Heritage Center (JHC) at New England Historic Genealogical Society

Wyner Family Jewish Heritage Center (JHC) at New England Historic Genealogical Society

“Guide to Researching Immigration History in our Collections.” The Center is a destination for exploring and preserving the histories of Jewish families and institutions in New England and beyond. It engages historians, genealogists, partner organizations, and the general public in the study of Jewish history, culture, and legacies through its extensive archival collections, educational programs, exhibits, and public events.

Boston’s immigrant past in 8 sites, mapped

Boston’s immigrant past in 8 sites, mapped

Tom Acitelli@tomacitelli, Boston’s immigrant past in 8 sites, mapped. These reminders include buildings, statues, and a famous Boston alleyway, 2019. “As America’s oldest urban area, Boston boasts quite a history, and immigration shaped a lot of that history. These markers and monuments are reminders of that. The points are a primer and are not meant to be exhaustive. After all, there are a plethora of markers dedicated just to the legacy of the Boston area’s Irish; and the North End is pretty much a museum to Italian-American culture and cuisine as is Boston’s Chinatown for Chinese-Americana.”

Jewish History and Settlement Patterns in Massachusetts

Jewish History and Settlement Patterns in Massachusetts

Alexander Woodle, “Jewish History and Settlement Patterns in Massachusetts,” 2010. “Most immigrants leave their homes for another place not for political reasons but for economic ones. Although our ancestors sometimes claimed a political motive, Jews coming to America—from Colonial times to the present—generally came for economic opportunity, and this can be seen as well in the pattern of Jewish settlement in Massachusetts.”