Irish Immigration to America, 1630 to 1921

Irish Immigration to America, 1630 to 1921

Catherine B. Shannon, “Irish Immigration to America, 1630 to 1921” (reprinted courtesy of the New Bedford Whaling Museum). From the article: “The oft quoted aphorism that “Boston is the next parish to Galway” highlights the long and close connections between Ireland and New England that extend as far back as the 1600s. Colonial birth, death, marriage, and some shipping records cite the presence of Irish born people as early as the 1630s. For instance, in 1655 the ship Goodfellow arrived in Boston carrying a group of indentured servants… However, up until 1715, the numbers of Irish in New England were less than 1%…”

Our Plural History: Springfield, MA.

Our Plural History: Springfield, MA.

From the site, developed at Springfield Technical Community College. “Numerous groups settled in the Springfield area, many in successive waves which often paralleled national immigration trends. Each of these groups came to the area as foreigners, each with unique histories and cultures. However, over time, these cultures and histories became intertwined, resulting in new cultural and social patterns that would come to define life in the Connecticut River Valley.”

The West End Museum.

The West End Museum.

“Immigrants began to arrive in the West End of Boston in 1845 when Ireland’s economic and political environment, especially the potato famine, created the conditions for the first large Irish immigration to Boston. After a brief period of settlement in the North End, many Irish families moved on to the West and South ends. The West End soon developed a thriving Irish community. By 1880, a new native-born generation of Irish descendants had secured their place in the community while retaining a distinct group identity.”

City of Boston, “Imagine All the People: Jamaicans in Boston”

City of Boston, “Imagine All the People: Jamaicans in Boston”

New Bostonians Series, 2016. From the report: “There have been three significant waves of Jamaican immigration to the United States since the beginning of the twentieth century. The first occurred between 1900 and 1924—when the National Origins Act severely restricted immigration to the U.S. Caribbean immigration to the United States would plummet from 10,630 in 1924 to 321 the following year.

The second wave picked up steam during World War II: starting in 1943, migrant workers were brought in to help with the U.S. war effort by working in agriculture. At first, a majority of migrants were directed to Florida, but many would relocate to other states. Many tobacco workers who were working in Connecticut chose to move to Boston and New York.”

City of Boston, “Imagine All the People: Vietnamese in Boston”

City of Boston, “Imagine All the People: Vietnamese in Boston”

New Bostonians Series, 2016. From the report: “The first significant wave of Vietnamese immigrants to the United States came in 1975 following the end of the Vietnam War and the collapse of the government of South Vietnam. The vast majority of Vietnamese who came to the United States in the years that followed came as refugees fleeing persecution and political oppression. Many who had worked for the U.S. government or were otherwise associated with the U.S. involvement in the war were evacuated by the military.”

City of Boston, “Imagine All the People: Chinese in Boston”

City of Boston, “Imagine All the People: Chinese in Boston”

New Bostonians Series, 2016. From the report: “The migration of Chinese individuals to Boston goes back over 100 years to the late 1800s when the first Chinese residents settled in what is now known as Boston’s Chinatown, centered on Beach Street and bordered by the Boston Common, Downtown Crossing, the South End and the Massachusetts Turnpike. Chinese immigrants who first settled in the area came from California, which had long been a popular destination for Chinese immigrants. Most came to Boston to flee anti-Chinese sentiment in California.

City of Boston, “Imagine all the people: Haitian immigrants in Boston”

City of Boston, “Imagine all the people: Haitian immigrants in Boston”

New Bostonians Series, 2009. From the article: The origin of the Haitian community in Massachusetts goes back to the late 1950s and the early 1960s when some Haitians fled the dictatorial regime of Franois Duvalier (Papa Doc). Massachusetts has the third largest Haitian community in the United States, after Florida and New York. According to the 2007 Census Bureau…there are an estimated 41,000 Haitians living in Massachusetts today. Boston’s Haitian-born immigrants settled in various parts of Boston, with the highest concentrations in Mattapan, along Blue Hill Avenue, as well as Roxbury, Dorchester, and Hyde Park.

Passenger Manifest (1848-1891)

Passenger Manifest (1848-1891)

Massachusetts officials started recording the names of immigrants who arrived by ship in January of 1848, a procedure which continued until July of 1891, when federal records-keeping programs superseded those of the state. Although immigrants arrived at numerous Massachusetts ports, the Archives holds manifests for BOSTON ONLY. These are arranged chronologically according to the date when the ship arrived in port. The Archives holds the original manifests as well as the only microfilm copy available of these Passenger manifests. The Archives has an alphabetical card index covering the same years as the registers and providing the same information. This includes the name, age, sex and occupation of the immigrant; the country of birth, last residence and the passenger list number.