The Contributions of New Americans in Rhode Island

The Contributions of New Americans in Rhode Island

New American Economy Report, “The Contributions of New Americans in Rhode Island,” August 2016. “Though it is our nation’s smallest state, Rhode Island has become a destination of choice for many newly arrived immigrants over the past several decades. In 1990, immigrants represented 9.5 percent of the state’s total population. By 2010, that share had risen to 12.4 percent. Between 2010 and 2014, Rhode Island’s immigrant population grew by almost 7,000 people, increasing in size by 5.2 percent.”

American Immigration Council, Immigrants in Rhode Island Fact Sheet,” 2017.

American Immigration Council, “Immigrants in Rhode Island Fact Sheet,” 2017.

“Rhode Island has a large community of immigrants, much of which emigrated from the Dominican Republic. More than one in eight Rhode Islanders was born in another country, while over 15 percent of residents are native-born Americans who have at least one immigrant parent. Rhode Island’s economy benefits from the active participation of immigrants in the labor force—from supporting the state’s administrative and service industries to representing a fourth of company and enterprise managers…”

Immigrants and Immigration in the Ocean State​

Immigrants and Immigration in the Ocean State

Alexandra Filindra and Shanna Pearson-Merkowitz, “Immigrants and Immigration in the Ocean State: History, Demography, Public Opinion and Policy Responses,” 2014. From the research: The immigrant population of Rhode Island exceeded the national average through the 1970s but today tracks the national average. In earlier eras, most immigrants to Rhode Island came from Europe but today, the fastest growing immigrant groups are Latinos and Asians. The Latino immigrant population of Rhode Island is quite distinct from other states because it largely consists of Caribbean rather than Mexican or Central American immigrants.”