Making home pay: Italian and Scottish boardinghouse keepers in Barre, 1880-1918

Making home pay: Italian and Scottish boardinghouse keepers in Barre, 1880-1918

Susan Richards, “Making home pay: Italian and Scottish boardinghouse keepers in Barre, 1880-1918,” Vermont History, 74 (Winter/Spring 2006): 48–66. “From 1880 to 1910 between 45 and 51 percent of Barre’s working women earned income from taking in boarders. The high numbers of Barre boardinghouse keepers made it distinctive among communities of its size.”

Maartje L. K. Melchiors, History of a Vermont Granite Town.

Maartje L. K. Melchiors, History of a Vermont Granite Town.

This is a pictoral history. “The rapidly growing population was fueled by the influx of immigrants from Europe who came to Vermont in search of fortune and a better life. The Scottish were the first immigrants to arrive in Barre followed by the Italians…”

National Park Service, “Vermont Immigration History.”

National Park Service, “Vermont Immigration History.”

“Native Americans, primarily from the Abenaki tribe, have lived in Vermont for 10,000 years. In 1609, French explorer Samuel de Champlain was the first European to set foot in Vermont. During the 17th century a few French military settlements were establish and abandoned, and the area became primarily a thoroughfare between French and Native American settlements to the north and English settlements to the south. As the English slowly pushed north, the first white settlements was made at Fort St. Anne, on Isle La Motte, in the middle of Lake Champlain near Canada…”

Vermont’s Immigration History – Vermont Public Radio

Vermont’s Immigration History - Vermont Public Radio

Nina Keck and Sam Gale Rosen, “Vermont’s Immigration History,” Vermont Public Radio, August 9, 2016. “As debate continues over Syrian refugees resettling in Rutland, we’re taking a look at the history of immigration into Vermont. We’ll look at waves of immigration into the state throughout the past centuries, and how the pre-existing population has received new Vermonters: Irish, French Canadians, Jews, and more. And we’ll talk about how immigration is tied to internal debates about our identity as a state.”

Migration: A Story of Vermont Before 1850

Migration: A Story of Vermont Before 1850

Scott Andrew Bartley, “Migration: A Story of Vermont Before 1850,” New England Historic Genealogical Society. “A researcher cannot hope to truly understand Vermont history without first studying the migratory history of the region. Vermont’s history is all about people on the move, in search of that better life beyond the congestion of the big cities and towns of southern New England. It is also about a political way of life. That, however, is a subject for another time. Let us turn our attention to the first settlements in Vermont.”

Then Again: Immigrants helped Vermont Boom

Then Again: Immigrants helped Vermont Boom

Mark Bushnell, “Then Again: Immigrants helped Vermont Boom,” 2016. Starting in the early-1700s, English immigrants entered Vermont. As with the French, the first Englishmen to live in Vermont were soldiers.”

The Contributions of New Americans in Vermont

The Contributions of New Americans in Vermont

New American Economy Report, 2016. “Today Vermont is home to more than 24,000 immigrants. These new Americans play outsize roles as everything from food service managers to computer programmers. For many business owners, such immigrant workers have been a vital reason why their businesses have been able to thrive in recent years.”