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Queen City Culture: Immigration, Food, Culture, and Burlington’s Local Food System


Queen City Culture: Immigration, Food, Culture, and Burlington’s Local Food System Ashley Raymond, “Queen City Culture: Immigration, Food, Culture, and Burlington’s Local Food System,” Scholar Works, University of Vermont, 2019. “This research is aimed at bringing to light, the scale of influence that Burlington’s immigrant history has had on the local food system which we […]

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October 2, 2020


Ailing Vermont Town Pins Hopes on Mideast Refugees​


Ailing Vermont Town Pins Hopes on Mideast Refugees Jess Bidgood, “Ailing Vermont Town Pins Hopes on Mideast Refugees,” New York Times, January 2, 2017. “They hustled into the church on a biting winter evening, unburdened themselves of scarves and gloves, and settled into pews to sound out words in Arabic. “Ahlan fii Rutland,” said Fran […]

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‘My Language Is My Language, But I’m a Vermonter’


‘My Language Is My Language, But I’m a Vermonter’ Erick Trickey, ‘My Language Is My Language, But I’m a Vermonter,’Politico Magazine, November 17, 2016. “Vermont has accepted thousands of refugees over the years, boosting the population and the economy. A debate over accepting Syrians put the state to the test.” Open Link

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Finnigans, Slaters and Stonepeggers: A History of Irish in Vermont


Finnigans, Slaters and Stonepeggers: A History of Irish in Vermont Vincent E. Feeney, Finnigans, Slaters and Stonepeggers: A History of Irish in Vermont, Images from the Past, 2009. “The first book that peels back the Yankee mythos and examines the surprisingly rich, true story of the Irish in Vermont, from the first steady trickle of […]

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“Champlain, the Irish Lake,” New England Historical Society


“Champlain, the Irish Lake,” New England Historical Society Vincent Feeney, “Champlain, the Irish Lake,” New England Historical Society. “Between 1840 and 1860, a great wave of Irish immigrants washed up on the shores of Lake Champlain. So many, in fact, that Vermont’s inland sea has been nicknamed the Irish Lake. The reason, of course, was […]

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Twenty-Five Years and 6,300 People Later: A Vermont Refugee Report


Twenty-Five Years and 6,300 People Later: A Vermont Refugee Report Kevin J. Kelley, “Twenty-Five Years and 6,300 People Later: A Vermont Refugee Report,” Seven Days, January 15, 2014. “Somali women in kaleidoscopic kangas brightening the Old North End; Vietnamese and Tibetan entrepreneurs selling banh mi or momo at food shops in Winooski; Bhutanese becoming suburban […]

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September 26, 2020


New Vermonters and Perspectives on Vermont, Migration


New Vermonters and Perspectives on Vermont, Migration Pablo Bose, “New Vermonters and Perspectives on Vermont, Migration,” The Northeastern Geographer, Vol. 7, 2015: 45 – 57. Journal of the New England-St. Lawrence Valley Geographical Society. Open Link

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19th Century French-Canadian Immigration to Vermont


19th Century French-Canadian Immigration to Vermont Michael F. Dwyer, “19th Century French-Canadian Immigration to Vermont: From Hyppolite Prunier to Fred Plumtree,” Walloomsack Review, 18, 20 – 29. “ By the beginning of the twentieth century, one could see the architectural imprint of French-Canadian settlement on the cultural landscape of Vermont. French-speaking Catholics built monumental churches […]

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French Canadian Immigration to Vermont and New England (1840-1930)


French Canadian Immigration to Vermont and New England (1840-1930) Leslie Choquette , “French Canadian Immigration to Vermont and New England (1840-1930),” Vermont History, 86 (Winter/Spring 2018): 1–8. “The Franco-American monument in Québec City lists 168 New England communities that were important migrant destinations, including twenty-one in Vermont. That list is nowhere near exhaustive.” Open Link

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Pre-Famine Irish in Vermont


Pre-Famine Irish in Vermont V. E. Feeney, “Pre-Famine Irish in Vermont, 1815–1844,” Vermont History, 74 (Summer/Fall 2006): 101–126. “On the eve of the immense migration of Irish spawned by the Great Famine of the late 1840s there was already a significant Irish presence in the Green Mountain State.” Open Link

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